Known Greek Gods[edit | edit source]

Major Olympians[edit | edit source]

  • Zeus: king of the Greek gods; God of the Sky and the Storms.
  • Hera: queen of the Greek gods; Goddess of women and marriage.
  • Hephaestus
  • Aphrodite
  • Ares
  • Athena
  • Poseidon: the god of the seas & protector of Atlantis. In Greek Mythology, he helped create the Minotaur as punishment to Minos. He even raped Medusa & he should have been punished by Zeus or Athena instead of her.
  • The Twins
  • Hermes
  • Hades: god of the underworld.
  • Demeter
  • Dionysus
  • Hestia

Minor Olympians[edit | edit source]

  • 9 Muses: Daughters of Zeus & Mnemosyne.
    • Calliope - Calliope is the Muse of epic poetry. Her name means “she of a beautiful voice”. Some accounts say that Calliope was the lover of Ares and bore him several sons, from whom many Thracian tribes claimed descent. Calliope had two famous sons, Orpheus and Linus by King Oeagrus of Thrace.
    • Clio - Clio is the Muse of history. Her name is derived from the Greek word kleo (“to make famous, to celebrate”). She has been credited with introducing the Pheonician alphabet into Greece.
    • Erato - The Muse of love poetry. Her name is derived from the Greek word eros and means “desired, lovely”.
    • Euterpe - Euturpe is the Muse of music and lyric poetry.
    • Melpomene - She is the Muse of tragedy. Her name is derived from the Greek verb melpô or melpomai, meaning “to celebrate with dance and song”. In Roman and Greek poetry, it was traditional to invoke the goddess Melpomene so that one might create beautiful lyrical phrases.
    • Polyhymnia - The Muse of hymns and oratory.
    • Terpsichore - Terpsichore is the Muse of dancing and choral songs. Her name means “delighting in dance.”
    • Thalia - Thalia is the Muse of comedy. Her name means “blooming, flourishing”. She was the eighth-born of the nine Muses.
    • Urania - Urania is the Muse of astrology. She was the last of the Muses to be born. Her name means “heavenly, of heaven”.
  • Adonis (don't be confused with the Disney's Hercules' version of Adonis): God of rebirth and vegetables
  • Asclepius - God of Healing and Medicine
  • Ceryx: Son of Hermes and a messenger God.
  • The Charities
    • Thalia ("plentiful" or "luxuriant"): The oldest of the three, Thalia is the goddess of festivity and banquets.
    • Euphrosyne ("merriment): The goddess of good cheer, mirth, merriment, and joy.
    • Aglaïa ("glory" or "splendor"): The youngest of the three, Aglaïa is the goddess of beauty, splendor, glory, and adornment.
  • Daphne
  • Divine Creatures
    • Fire Steeds: the horses that pull the Sun Chariot of Apollo/Helios
      • Pyrois
      • Aeos
      • Aethon
      • Phlegon
    • Cacus
    • Chiron
    • Pegasus
    • Talos
  • The Fate Sisters:
    • Lahkesis: Goddess of Present and a Sister of Fate.
    • Atropos: Goddess of Future and a Sister of Fate.
    • Clotho: Goddess of Past and a Sister of Fate.
  • Furies - The Goddesses of Vengeance
    • Alecto
    • Megaera
    • Tisiphone
  • Gods for the 1980's A.D.
    • Ataros - God of the Video Arcade
    • Bromo - God of Fasts Foods
    • Brooke of the Denim Shield - Goddess of Designer Jeans
    • Cubicus Rubicus - God of Infernal Obsession
    • Pak-Man - Messenger God
    • Paranoia - God of both Liberals (evil) and Conservatives (good)
    • Walkman - God of Cosmic Indifference
  • Harmonia
  • Hebe
  • Hercules/Heracles - Champion of Olympus, patron of heroes - God of strength, bravery, might
  • Horea
    • Diké (Δίκη, "Justice"; Iustitia for Romans) was the goddess of moral justice: she ruled over human justice, as her mother Themis ruled over divine justice.
    • Eunomia (Εὐνομία, "Order", governance according to good laws) was the goddess of law and legislation.
    • Eirene or Irene (Εἰρήνη. "Peace"; the Roman equivalent was Pax) was the personification of peace and wealth, and was depicted in art as a beautiful young woman carrying a cornucopia, scepter and a torch or rhyton.
  • Hypnos (known in Ancient Rome as Somnus)
  • Joya
  • Water Gods
    • Amphitrite - Wife of Poseidon
    • Sons of Amphitrite & Poseidon
      • Triton
      • Eryx
    • Neptunia (Rhode) - a Sea Goddess
    • Thetis
  • Roman Gods
    • Adgistis
    • Janus: god of space & time
  • Nemesis
  • Pan
  • Persephone - daughter of Demeter , wife of Hades, goddess of the springtime & Queen of the Underworld.
  • Tharamus - the god of learning but works as the curator of the Museum of Greek Antiquity.
  • Titans who become gods:
    • Iris: Goddess of Rainbow and Messages.
    • Hecate (known in Roman times as Trivia): Titan/Goddess of Magic and Crossroads.
    • Prometheus: Titan of Mankind
    • Epimetheus: Brother of Prometheus
    • Mnemosyne - Titan of memory and the mother of the Muses with Zeus
    • Eos: Goddess/Titaness of Dawn and sister to Helios and Selene
    • Helios: Titan of the Sun
    • Selene: Titan of the Moon
    • Zelus: God of Dedication, Jealously, Envy, Zeal.
    • Nike: Goddess of Victory.
    • Kratos: God of Strength, Might and Sovereign Rule.
    • Bia: Goddess of Force, Might, and Power.
    • Themis - Goddess of Justice
    • Leto
    • Maia
  • Tyche: Goddess of Luck

Other Minor Gods[edit | edit source]

  • Good Gods:
    • The Palici - The gods of two Sicilian geysers. They were also protectors of runaway slaves and defenders of the sacred oaths sworn on their waters.
    • The goddesses of welfare:
      • Pherousa - "the bringer"
      • Euporie - "abundance"
      • Orthosie - "prosperity"
    • Gelos/Risus (Γελως|) - Lord of comedy, God of laughter, happiness, humor.
    • Eleos/Clementia (Ἔλεος|) - Goddess of mercy
    • Dicaeosyne (Δικαιοσυνη) - Goddess of equity, justice and righteousness
    • Ececheira (Εκεχειρα) - Goddess of truce, armistice, and the cessation of all hostilities; honoured at the Olympic Games
    • Philophrosyne (Φιλοφροσυνη) - Goddess of friendliness and welcome
    • Soteria (Σωτηρια) - Goddess of safety, deliverance and preservation from harm.
    • Hedone/Voluptas (Ἡδονη|)- Goddess of pleasure, enjoyment and delight
    • Calocagathia (Καλοκαγαθια) - Goddess of nobility and goodness
    • Sophrosyne (Σωφροσύνη) - Goddess of moderation, self-control, temperance, restraint, and discretion
    • Angelia/Angela (Ανγελια|) - Goddess of messages, tidings and proclamations
    • Aletheia (Ἀλήθεια) - Goddess of truth/truthfulness and sincerity
    • Eupheme (Ευφημη) - Goddess of words of good omen, acclamation, praise, applause and shouts of triumph.
    • Pistis/Fides (Πιστις|) - Goddess of trust
    • Eucleia (Ευκλεια) - Goddess of good repute and glory
    • Euphrosyne (Ευφροσυνη) - Goddess of good cheer, joy, mirth and merriment
    • Arete/Virtus (Αρετη|) - Goddess of virtue, excellence, goodness and valour
    • Eusebia/Pietas (Ευσεβια|) - Goddess of piety, loyalty, duty and filial respect
    • Eudaemonia (Ευδαεμονια) - Goddess of happiness, prosperity and opulence.
    • Paregoros/Consolatio (Παρηγορος|) - Goddess of soothing words. She was an attendant of Aphrodite
    • Dikaiosyne (Δικαιοσύνη) - Goddess of justice and righteousness
    • Poine (Ποίνη), spirit of retribution, vengeance, recompense, punishment and penalty for murder and manslaughter
    • Parthenos (Παρqενος) - A virgin goddess. She was a Naxian princess who leapt into the sea to escape the wrath of her stepfather Staphylos. Her real father Apollo then rescued her and transformed her into a goddess
    • Aidos (Αἰδώς) - God of modesty, reverence and respect
    • Alke (Ἀλκή) - Goddess of prowess and courage
    • Apheleia (Ἀφέλεια) - Goddess of simplicity
    • Eulabeia (Εὐλάβεια) - spirit of discretion, caution and circumspection
    • Horkos (Ὅρκος) - God of oaths
    • Kalokagathia (Καλοκαγαθία), spirit of nobility
    • Nomos (Νόμος) - God of law
    • Ponos (Πόνος), spirit of hard labour and toil
    • Soter (Σωτήρ), male spirit of safety, preservation and deliverance from harm
    • Thrasos (Θράσος) - God of boldness
    • Eupraxia (Ευπραξια) - Goddess of good conduct
    • Euthenia () - Goddess of prosperity
    • Homonoia (Ὁμονοια) - Goddess of concord and unity
    • Horcus (Ὁρκος|) - God of the binding oath who punished the oath-breaker
    • Pherusa () - Goddess of plenty and abundance
    • Philotes (Roman: Amicitia) - Goddess of affection and friendship
    • Elpis
    • Alce - Goddess of battle strength, prowess and courage
    • Aidos (Roman: Pudicitia) - Goddess of modesty and respect
    • Epiphron - God of prudence, thoughtfulness and carefulness
    • Agathodaemon
  • Britomartis (Βριτομαρτις) - Maiden goddess of the nets and fast companion of Artemis.
  • Pheme/Fama (Φήμη|) - Goddess of rumour, fame
  • Death/Underworld Deities
    • Thanatos/Letus (Θάνατος|) - Lieutenant of the Underworld - God of death
    • Melinoe (Μηλινοη) - Goddess of ghosts
    • Macaria (Μακαρια) - Goddess of blessed death
    • Charon (Χαρων) - Ferrymen of the dead - God of boundaries
    • Serapis
  • Ariadne/Ariana (Ἀριάδνη|) - Lady of passion - Goddess of labyrinths, paths
  • Chloris/Flora (Χλωρίς|) - Goddess of flowers
  • Children of Zeus & Hera:
    • Angelos (Ἄγγελος), a daughter of Zeus and Hera who became an underworld goddess
    • Eileithyia/Lucina (Εἰλείθυια|) - Goddess of childbirth
  • Evil Gods:
    • Aegaeon (Αιγαιος), god of violent sea storms and ally of the Titans
    • The Androktasiai (Ἀνδροκτασίαι), spirits of battlefield slaughter
      • Palioxis (Παλιωξις) - God of backrush, one the spirits of the battlefield.
    • Phrike (Φρικη) - Goddess of horror, trembling fear
    • Anaideia (Ἀναίδεια) Goddess of ruthlessness, shamelessness, and unforgivingness
    • Apate: goddess of deceit, guile, fraud and deception
    • Autolycus: god of thieves
    • Callisto
    • Circe: The goddess of magic
    • Dysnomia (Δυσνομία) - Goddess of lawlessness and poor civil constitution
    • Dolos (Dechalafrea Ero in DC Extended Unverse): god of trickery & the Duke of Deception/Lies & Chaos
    • Enyalius (Ενυαλιος) - Minor god of war
    • Enyo
    • Eride: Goddess of hate
    • Eris (Discord) - the goddess of strife, discord & chaos.
    • Ares' Sons
      • Deimos - God of Terror
      • Kyknos
      • Phobos: God of Fear
    • Geras/Senectus (Γηρας|) - God of old age
    • Lachrymose - God of the Despair, Boredom and Misfortune
    • Limos/Fames (Λιμος|) - God of hunger, starvation
    • The Litae - Goddesses of prayers followed in the footsteps of Ate, the bringer of ruin
    • Livilla
    • Methe (Μεθη) - Goddess nymph of drunkenness
    • Momus - God of Satire
    • Narcissus: God of vanity
    • Neicea - The female personifications of grievance and quarrel
    • Nosi - Spirits of pestilence and disease which were released from Pandora's jan
    • Nyx: goddess of night
    • Oizys: Goddess of Misery
    • Snatos
    • Prophasis (Προφασις) - Goddess of excuses
    • Alastor (Ἀλάστωρ) - God of blood feuds and vengeance
    • Corus (Κορος) - God of satiety and surfeit, insolence and disdain
    • Velasca - Goddess of Chaos
    • Peitho/Suadela (ΠειΘω|) - Goddess of persuasion, seduction and charming speech
    • Aporia/Egestas (Απορια|) - Goddess of difficulty, perplexity, powerlessness
    • Koalemos (Κοάλεμος) - God of stupidity and foolishness
    • Amechania (Αμηχανια) - Goddess of helplessness
    • Phthonus (Φθονος) - God of jealousy, envy, the jealous passion of love
    • Ate (Ἄτη) - Goddess of delusion, infatuation, blind folly, recklessness and ruin
    • Lyssa/Furor (Λυσσα|) - Goddess of rage, fury, raging madness, frenzy, and the madness of rabies in animals
    • Aergia/Socordia (Ἀεργία|) - Goddess of idleness, laziness, indolence, apathy and sloth
    • Ganymede (Γανυμηδη) - Prince of Troy - God of homosexual love
    • Silenos () - God of drunkenness, he was the mentor and companion of the god Dionysus.
    • Achlys (Ἀχλύς) - Goddess of the death-mist
    • Adephagia (Ἀδηφαγία) - Goddess of satiety and gluttony
    • Adikia (Ἀδικία) - Goddess of injustice and wrong-doing
    • Penia () - Goddess of poverty.
    • Penthus (Πενθος) - God of grief, mourning, sorrow and lamentation.
    • Dolos (Δόλος) - God of trickery, cunning deception, craftiness, treachery and guile
    • Dyssebeia (Δυσσέβεια), spirit of impiety
    • Kydoimos (Κυδοιμός), spirit of the din of battle, confusion, uproar and hubbub
    • Mania (Μανία), Goddess of madness, insanity and frenzy
    • Momus (Μῶμος) - God of mockery, blame, censure and stinging criticism
    • Moros (Μόρος) - God of doom
    • Penthos () - God of grief, lamentation, and mourning
    • Polemos () - Daimon of war and battle
    • Oizys (Ὀϊζύς) - God of woe and misery
    • Praxidike (Πραξιδίκη) - Goddess of exacting justice
    • Cydoimus () - God/Goddess of confusion, a daemon of the battlefield.
    • Dolus (Δολος) - God of trickery and deceit
    • Hybris/Petulantia (Ὑβρις|) - Goddess of insolence and excessive pride.
    • Ioke () - Goddess of onslaught, pursuit and rout in battle
    • Porus () - God of expediency
    • Proioxis (Προιωξις) - The battlefield God of onrush
    • Ptocheia (Πτωχεια) - Goddess of beggary
    • The Androktasiai (Ἀνδροκτασίαι), spirits of battlefield slaughter
    • The Praxidicae - The goddess exacters of justice.
    • The Pseudologoi - The spirits of lies.
    • The Phonoi (Φόνοι) - Spirits of murder, killing and slaughter
    • The Arae (Ἀραί), spirits of curses
    • The Makhai (Μάχαι) - spirits of fighting and combat
    • The Neikea (Νείκη), spirits of quarrels, feuds and grievances
    • The Keres (Κῆρες), spirits of violent or cruel death
      • Anaplekte
      • Achlys
      • Nosos
      • Ker
      • Stygere
    • The Amphilogiai (Ἀμφιλογίαι) - Spirits of disputes, debate and contention
    • The Algea (Ἄλγεα) - Spirits of pain and suffering Achos
    • Phales - God of the phallus paraded in the Dionysian fertility procession. He was also a god of adultery and pedastery.
    • Hybris (Roman: Petulantia) - Goddess of Pride and violence
    • Ioke - Goddess of Onslaught and persuit
    • Adephagia
    • Hesychia
    • Kakia
    • Maniae
    • Methe
    • Olethros
    • Penthus
    • Thanatos
  • Sky Deities
    • The Winds Gods
      • Aeolus, the master of all winds
      • Boreas: God of the North Wind.
      • Zephyrus: God of the West Wind.
      • Notus: God of the South Wind.
      • Eurus: God of the East Wind.
      • Lips/Africus (Λιψ|) - God of the southwest wind
      • Euronotus (Ευρονοτος) - God of the Southeast wind
      • Caicias (Χαικιας) - God of the northeast wind
      • Skeiron (Σκειρων) - God of the northwest
    • The goddesses of seasons of the year
      • Eiar - spring
      • Theros - summer
      • Pthinoporon - autumn
      • Cheimon - winter
    • Khione/Chione (χιών|) - Lady of winter - Goddess of snow
    • Bronte (Βροντη) - God of thunder
    • Astrape'/'Fulgora (Αστραπη) - God of lightning
    • Hesperus
    • Phosphorus
  • Love/Sex Deities
    • Erotes
      • Anteros
      • Atlantiades - the God of Androgyny and Unions, Lust and Desire, among several other things
      • Hedylogos
      • Himeros () - God of sexual desire and unrequited love
      • Hymen
      • Pothus (Ποθος) - God of sexual longing
      • Eros: God of Love and Desire.
      • Hermaphroditus: the God of Androgyny, Sexuality, Unions, Fertility and Marriage
    • Marriage Deities
      • Hymenaios
    • Iynx/Jinx (Ιύνξ) - Oread nymph of Arcadia - Goddess of the love charm
    • Philotes/Amicitia (Φιλοτης|) - Goddess of affection, friendship and perhaps also sex.
  • Caerus/Occasio (Καιρος) - God of opportunity
  • Aristaeus (Αρισταιος) - God of shepherds, cheese-making, bee-keeping, honey, honey-mead, olive growing, medicinal herbs
  • Harpocrates (Ἁρποκρατες) - God of silence
  • Horae - the 12 goddesses of hours of the day and 12 months of the year.
    • Auge - Horae of daybreak
    • Anatole
    • Elete
    • Nymphe
    • Gymnastike
    • Acte
    • Mesembria - Horae of midday
    • Mousike
    • Hesperis - Horae of evening
    • Dysis - Horae of sunset
    • Sponde - Horae of offerings
    • Arktos
  • Roman Gods
    • Good Roman Gods
      • Pomona - Goddess of plenty
      • Abundantia - Goddess of prosperity and abundance
      • Aequitas, divine personification of fairness.
      • Bona Dea - "Women's goddess" of fertility, healing, and chastity.
      • Bonus Eventus, divine personification of "Good Outcome".
      • Disciplina - Goddess of discipline
      • Felicitas, personification of good luck and success.
      • Feronia - Goddess concerned with plebeians, freedmen, and liberality in a general sense.
      • Hersilia - Goddess of courage
      • Hilaritas - Goddess of rejoicing and good humor.
      • Honos - God of honor.
      • Intercidona, minor goddess of childbirth; invoked to keep evil spirits away from the child; symbolised by a cleaver.
      • Liber, a god of male fertility, viniculture and freedom
      • Liberalitas - goddess of generosity.
      • Libertas - goddess of freedom.
      • Nerio - Goddess of war and valor
      • Orcus - Punisher of broken oaths - Minor underworld god
      • Pudicitia - Goddess of chastity, one of the Roman virtues
      • Spes
      • Tranquillitas - the Roman Goddess of tranquility, security, calmness and peace
      • Sancus - the Roman God of honesty, trust and oaths
      • Veritas: the goddess of truth
    • Janus - God of choices, doorways, gates, beginnings and endings
    • Roman Water Gods
      • Acis, god of the Acis River in Sicily.
      • Glaucus - Sea god
      • Melicertes - Minor sea-god
      • Calliste (Kalliste) - A sea-nymph daughter of the fish-tailed Triton and goddess of the island of Calliste.
      • Calypso (Kalypso) - The goddess-nymph of the island Ogygia who detained the hero Odysseus for many years.
      • Camenae - goddesses with various attributes including fresh water, prophecy, and childbirth. There were four of them: Carmenta, Egeria, Antevorta, and Postvorta.
      • Fontus - God of wells and springs.
      • Juturna - Goddess of fountains, wells, and springs.
      • Larunda
      • Tiberinus
    • Aeternitas - goddess and personification of eternity.
    • Aion (Aeon), god of cyclical or unbounded time, related to the concepts of aevum or saeculum
    • Roman Animal Deities:
      • Angitia, goddess associated with snakes and Medea.
      • Bubona - goddess of cattle.
      • Epona - Goddess of horses and horsemanship
      • Faustitas, goddess who protected herd and livestock.
      • Mellona - Goddess of bees and beekeeping.
      • Angitia - goddess associated with snakes and Medea
    • Anna Perenna, early goddess of the "circle of the year"
    • Annona - Goddess of the grain supply to the city of Rome.
    • Poena - Goddess of punishment
    • Portunus - God of keys, doors and livestock
    • Antevorta - goddess of the future
    • Cloacina - Goddess who presided over the system of sewers in Rome
    • Roman Birth, Family & Marriage Deities
      • Cinxia, goddess of marriage; name occurs as an epithet of Juno.
      • Carmentes - two goddesses of childbirth: Antevorta and Postvorta or Porrima, future and past.
      • Carmenta - goddess of childbirth and prophecy
      • Meditrina, goddess of healing, introduced to account for the festival of Meditrinalia
      • Nascio - God/Goddess of the act of birth.
      • Pilumnus, minor guardian god, concerned with the protection of infants at birth.
      • Postverta - Goddess of childbirth and the past, one of the two Carmentes
      • Picumnus, minor god of fertility, agriculture, matrimony, infants and children.
    • Roman Health Deities
      • Carna - goddess who preserved the health of the heart and other internal organs.
      • Febris - Goddess of fever and malaria prevention
      • Meditrina - Goddess of healing, introduced to account for the festival of Meditrinalia.
    • Cardea - goddess of the hinge
    • Dea Dia - goddess of growth.
    • Deverra - goddess who ruled over the brooms used to purify temples in preparation for various worship services, sacrifices and celebrations; she protected midwives and women in labor.
    • Empanda - Goddess of hospitality whose temple never closed to those in need.
    • Evil Roman Gods
      • Cacia (Κακια) - Goddess of vice.
      • Fascinus, god who protected from invidia (envy) and the evil eye.
      • Angerona - Goddess who relieved people from pain and sorrow.
      • Laverna - Patroness of thieves, Con men and charlatans.
      • Mefitis - Goddess and personification of poisonous gases and volcanic vapours.
      • Viriplaca - goddess of marital strife.
    • Ferentina, patron goddess of the city Ferentinum, Latium, protector of the Latin commonwealth.
    • Silvanus - Protector of woodlands - God of forests
    • Inuus - God of fertility and sexual intercourse, protector of livestock.
    • Roman Death/Underworld Deities
      • Helernus
      • Libitina - Goddess of death, corpses and funerals.
      • Mana Genita, goddess who presided over burials, mother or leader of the Manes
      • Orcus
    • Lua - Goddess to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons
    • Lupercus - God of shepherds; as the god of the Lupercalia
    • Mana Genita - Goddess of infant mortality
    • Mater Matuta - Patroness of marines - Goddess of dawn and childbirth
    • Sylvanus - God of the forest.
    • Naenia - Goddess of funerary lament.
    • Roma - Goddess of the Roman state
    • Pietas - goddess of duty
    • Porrima - Goddess of the future
    • Providentia - goddess of forethought.
    • Maron - One of the drunken old silen gods. The charioteer of Dionysus
    • Melisseus - Old curete god of honey and honey-mead
    • Beroe - The goddess of the Phoenician city of Beruit for whose hand in marriage the gods Poseidon and Dionysus went to battle.
    • Bootes - The agricultural god of the plough who also invented the wagon.
    • Cabeiri (Kabeiroi) - The gods of forged agricultural implements who presided over the Cabeirian Mysteries of the Greek island of Samothrace.
    • Calligeneia (Kalligeneia) - The nurse of Persephone - Goddess of the Eleusinian Mysteries.
    • Terminus - Protector of the territory of Rome - God of boundaries
    • Collatina - goddess of hills
    • Cybele - a goddess of caverns and mountains, walls and fortresses, nature, wild animals
    • Fecunditas, goddess of fertility.
    • Feronia, rural goddess of woods and fountains
    • Fornax, goddess of hearths and ovens.
    • Lares, household gods
    • Fauna - goddess of vegetation
    • Puta - goddess of pruning vines and bushes.
    • Salus - goddess of the public welfare of the Roman people; came to be equated with the Greek Hygieia.
    • Semonia - goddess of sowing.
    • Summanus
    • Statina
    • Vallonia - goddess of valleys.
    • Vertumnus - god of the seasons, and of gardens and fruit trees.
    • Voluptas - goddess of pleasure.
    • Virtus - god or goddess of military strength
    • Tempestas - the Roman goddess of storms
    • Angerona - the Roman goddess of secrecy
    • Aeternitas
    • Britannia
    • Caca
    • Caelus
    • Dea Tacita
    • Flora
    • Genius
    • Juventas
    • Mutunus Tutunus
    • Ops
    • Palatua
    • Pales
    • Sol Invictus
    • Vejovis
    • Vesper
    • Viridios
  • Water Gods
    • Camenae - goddesses with various attributes including fresh water, prophecy, and childbirth
      • Carmenta
      • Egeria
      • Antevorta
      • Postvorta
    • Eurybia (Ευρυβια) - Goddess of the sea's power
    • Panope - Goddess of water
    • Marine Animal Gods
      • Palaemon: God of Sharks.
      • Delphin: God of Dolphins.
      • Gaaeus () - A fish-tailed marine god, herder of the fish of the sea.
      • Proteus () - An old sea god, the herdsman of the seals of Poseidon
      • Nereus () - The old man of the sea - god of the sea's rich bounty of fish
      • Proteus (), a shape-shifting, prophetic old sea god, and the herdsman of Poseidon's seals
    • Nereids - 50 sea-goddess daughters of Nereus. They personified different aspects of the sea
      • Panopia (Πανοπια) - Nereid goddess of panorama, the sighting of land and uncoming storms
    • Oceanides - The 3,000 fresh-water nymph daughters of the earth-encirling river Oceanus. They were nymphs of standing water (Naiads), clouds (Nephelai), cool breezes (Aurai), meadows (Leimonides) and groves (Alseides). The eldest of them were lower ranked Titan goddesses
    • River Gods:
      • Achelous: God of the River Achelous
      • Acheron
      • Simoeis () - God of a river of Troy
      • Styx
      • Scamander () - God of a river of Troy.
      • Lythe
    • Galene (Γαληνη) - Goddess of calm seas
    • Psamathe (Ψαμαθη) - Goddess of sand beaches
    • Cymopolea (Κυμοπολεια) - Goddess of the waves.
    • Nesoi - Goddesses of the islands. Each island was said to have its own personification
    • The Cabeiri - spirits who presided over the Mysteries of the islands of Lemnos and Samothrace
      • Aitnaios
      • Alkon
      • Eurymedon
      • Onnes
      • Tonnes
    • Brizo (Βριζώ) - Patron goddess of sailors, who sent prophetic dreams
    • Leucothea (Λευκοθεα) - Sea goddess who aided sailors in distress
    • Doris () - Oceanid goddess of the fresh water mingling with the brine.
    • Ersa (Ερςα) - Goddess of the dew.
    • Helle (Ἑλλη) - Goddess of the Hellespont Sea which divides the continents of Europe and Asia
    • Ino (Ινω) - Minor sea-goddess
    • Phorcys (), God of the hidden dangers of the deep
    • Thaumas (), god of the wonders of the sea
    • Kymopoleia: Goddess of storms
    • Telesto
  • Oneiroi
    • Morpheus - God of Dreams
    • Phantasos (Φάντασος) - God of dreams of fantasy, who takes shape of inanimate objects
    • Phobetor (Φοβητωρ) - God of nightmares
  • Health Deities
    • Children of the divine physician Asclepius
      • Hygieia (Ὑγεια) - Goddess of good health
      • Iaso (Ιασω) - Goddess of recovery, one of the daughters of the divine physician Asclepius.
      • Panacea (Πανακεια) - Goddess of cures. She was a daughter of the medicine-god Asclepius
    • Aceso (Ακεσο) - Goddess of healing and curing
    • Paeon (Παιηον) - The physician of the gods.
    • Aegle (Αἴγλη), goddess of radiant good health
    • Epione (Ηπιονη) - Goddess of the soothing of pain
  • Pannychis () - Goddess of night-time parties and festivities. She was one of the attendants of Aphrodite
  • Palaestra (Παλαιστρα) - Goddess of wrestling
  • Hesychia/Silentia (Ἡσυχια|) - Goddess of quiet, rest, silence and stillness
  • Thoosa (Θοωσα) - Sea symph of Sicily - Goddess of swift currents
  • Psyche (Ψυχη) - Goddess of the soul
  • Chrysus (Χρύσος) - God of gold
  • Eiresione (Ειρεσιώνη) - Goddess of the olive branch
  • Techne (Τεχνη) - Goddess of art, technical skill, magic, craft and invention
  • Alala (Ἀλαλά) - Goddess of war cry
  • Hormes (Ὁρμης) - God of effort
  • Ichnaea (Ιχναία) - Goddess of tracking
  • Mountain Deities
    • Aetna (Αιτνα) - Goddess of the volcanic Mount Etna in Sicily
    • Ourea - The mountain gods. Each mountain had its own god.
    • Orithyia (Ὠρείθυια) - Goddess of cold, gusty mountain winds
    • Oxylus (Οχυλος) - Mountain god of thick forest
  • Epiphron (Επιφρων) - God of shrewdness and careful consideration
  • Orthosia (Ορθωσια) - Goddess of agricultural prosperity
  • Alectrona (Αλεκτρονα), solar goddess of the morning or waking up
  • Comus (Κωμος) - God of revelry, merrymaking and festivity
  • Pandaisia (Πανδαιςια) - Goddess of banquets. She was one of the attendants of Aphrodite
  • Agon (Ἀγών), spirit of contest, who possessed an altar at Olympia, site of the Olympic Games.
  • Aisa (Αἴσα) - Goddess of lot and fate
  • Heimarmene (Εἵμαρμένη), personification of share destined by fate
  • Horme (Ὁρμή) - Goddess of impulse or effort (to do a thing), eagerness, setting oneself in motion, and starting an action
  • Peitharchia (Πειθαρχία) - God of obedience
  • Pepromene (Πεπρωμένη) - Goddess of the destined share, similar to Heimarmene
  • Chrysothemis () - Goddess of the golden-rites of the grain harvest.
  • Eunostos (Ευνοστος) - Goddess of the flour mill.
  • Homadus (Ὁμαδος) - God of battlenoise and tumult
  • Opora () - Goddess of the ripe fruit of late summer
  • Celestial Spirits
    • Astra Planeta/Stella Errante - Gods of the five wandering stars or planets
      • Stilbon (Στιλβών), god of Hermaon, the planet Mercury
      • Eosphorus (Ηωσφόρος), god of Venus the morning star
      • Hesperus (Ἓσπερος), god of Venus the evening star
      • Pyroeis (Πυρόεις), god of Areios, the planet Mars
      • Phaethon (Φαέθων), god of Dios, the planet Jupiter
      • Phaenon (Φαίνων), god of Kronion, the planet Saturn
    • Menae - 50 goddess nymphs of the 50 lunar months of the 4 year olympiad
  • Triteia (), daughter of Triton and companion of Ares
  • Hecaterus - God of the hekateris — a rustic dance of quickly moving hands — and perhaps of the skill of hands in general
  • Priapus () - God of garden fertility
  • Silenus - Old rustic god of the dance of the wine-press
  • Chrysothemis - Goddess of the "Golden Custom", a harvest festival Despoina, daughter of Poseidon and Demeter, goddess of mysteries in Arcadia
  • The Hysminai (Ὑσμῖναι), spirits of fighting and combat
  • The Nymphai Hyperboreioi - who presided over aspects of archer
  • Plutus: God of Wealth
  • Aphaea
  • Chrysos
  • Eubouleus
  • Karmanor
  • Triptolemus
  • Desponia
  • Pasithea - Goddess of rest and relaxation
  • Eupheme - Goddess of praise and applause
  • Harpocrates - God of Silence
  • Techne - Goddess of Art
  • Aristaeus
  • Astraea
  • Horkos
  • Karpos
  • Peitharchia
  • Poena
  • Ponos
  • Zagreus


Powers & Abilities[edit | edit source]

Powers[edit | edit source]

The Olympian Gods and Goddesses are incredibly powerful beings that possess abilities such as: near omnipotence, immortality, superhuman strength, shape-shifting, teleportation, and omnipresence. The gods also possess energy- based abilities, such as magic abilities and energy projection. They can grant powers to non-godly thing, since some are capable of life-giving to objects or giving supernatural powers to those who don't possess it with ease.

Each god has specific powers based on what they force represent, but they all share certain powers and even abilities specific to their individual domains can sometimes overlap. Each of the Big Three, after overthrowing the Titans, took one of the three physical domains on earth (the heavens, ocean, and the underworld). This is why the Big Three are the most powerful and influential gods on Olympus.

  • Greco-Roman Deity Physiology
    • Cosmic Awareness
    • Divinity, or Dark Divinity (varies between deities)
      • Deity Soul
      • Divine Aura: All Olympian gods and goddesses are human in appearance but far greater in height and stature; though they can manifest themselves to the heights of typical humans for interactions sake. They possess a glowing aura of divinity emitting from their body; also, they possess a wide range of skin and hair color (but NEVER be or act/behave like the Left [one of the REAL earthly enemies of mankind] who judge/criticize humans by skin color, race, politics, etc.).
      • Divine Form (Death Inducement; the Greek Gods were know to possess extremely powerful divine forms that could kill or vaporize mortals. Thankfully, Demigods are immune to it)
      • Curse Inducement
      • Divine Powers (varies)
      • Divine Presence
      • Divine Force Manipulation (varies)
      • Domain Warping
      • Immortality: Olympian Gods are immortal; as they cannot be killed by natural means or most supernatural means, as well as the fact that they do not visibly age. In addition to their immortality, all gods draw most off their power from their sphere of control or domain, but they all share certain powers, and even abilities specific to their individual domains can sometimes overlap. They possess the ability to live forever without fear of aging or dying. But Demigods do not visibly age; as they possess a form of agelessness.
        • Alleged True Immortality: Unlike Asgardians (Aesir & Vanir), all Olympians are true immortals. They cease to age upon reaching adulthood and cannot die by conventional means. Their bodies are also immune to all known Earthly terrestrial diseases and resistant to conventional injury.
        • Gods consume a divine food and drink called nectar and ambrosia. It is too powerful for mortals to eat under normal circumstances as they will literally burst into flames, yet in some myths, the gods have used nectar and ambrosia to bestow immortality upon a mortal, though it's more likely that the nectar and ambrosia are specially prepared for a mortal. Demigods, however, can consume small amounts of both in order to regain strength and heal wounds, though too much will make them ill or destroy them in the same way it would a mortal.
        • Concept-Dependent Immortality
      • Supernatural/Absolute Condition: Physical augmentation of their physical capabilities
        • Supernatural Physical Attributes
        • Superhuman Strength: All Olympians are superhumanly strong with the average male god being able to lift about 30 million/billion tons and the average female goddess being able to lift about 25 million/billion tons. Their strength are rivaled only by Kryptonians or some of the New Gods. However, power of Demigods is not quite on the same level except Diana who can lift 1.991 sextillion tons.
          • Superhuman Leaping: Olympian Gods and Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman leaping; as they can several stories in a single bound.
        • Superhuman Durability: Olympian Gods and Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman durability.
          • Regenerative Healing Factor: Despite their natural durability, it is possible for any of the Olympians to sustain injury. However, if an Olympian is injured, his or her godly life force enables him or her to recover with superhuman levels of speed and efficiency. As with most of their other powers, the speed and extent of these powers varies from one Olympian to another. For instance, most Olympians are unable to naturally regenerate missing limbs or organs while a small minority can, unless if they use magical assistance to do so.
        • Superhuman Speed: All Olympians have the potential of being able to run and move at speeds much greater than the finest human athlete. They and their Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman speed.
          • Superhuman Agility: Olympian Gods and Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman agility.
          • Superhuman Reflexes: Olympian Gods and Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman reflexes.
        • Superhuman Stamina: The musculature of all Olympians produces considerably less fatigue toxins during physical activity than the muscles of human beings; as they can remain physically active for long periods of time without tiring at all.
        • Superhuman Senses: Olympian Gods and Demigods possess tremendous level of superhuman senses.
          • Gods also possess the ability to tell whether or not someone is a demigod and who is their divine parent since the gods are able to claim their children.
        • Superhumanly Dense Tissue: The skin, muscle, and bone tissues of all Olympians are about 3 times denser than similar human tissue, contributing to the Olympians' superhuman strength and weight.
        • Superhuman Immunity: Due to their accelerated healing factors; Olympian gods and demigods are immune to all types of diseases, illnesses, sickness, drugs, poisons, toxins, etc.
        • Enhanced Skills / Absolute Combat
        • Non-Human Physiology
        • Self-Sustenance
        • Superpowered Physiology
      • Divine Power Link
    • Omni-Psionics
    • Magic: Gods possess a nearly limitless amount of magical control over their domain, as well as many general powers including levitation, teleportation, telepathy, manipulating the elements, among other vast amounts of control over the world. The limits of a god's power in this regard is unknown, as is to what extent they can cross into the domain of another. Supernatural powers of a magical nature (as opposed to cosmic), ability to alter their appearances at will; including reducing themselves to the size of a typical human, as well as completely altering their looks, voices, and even gender.
    • Elemental Manipulation
    • Entity Physiology
    • Dimensional Travel: The Olympians can travel between Olympus and Earth, or send artifacts between them.
    • Additionally, the Olympians have some power related to his/her individual sphere of influence: Dionysus, as god of wine, has full control of wine; Demeter, as goddess of agriculture, has total control of plants.
    • Only the power of the Olympian Gods can destroy the Mount Olympus.
    • Some gods have abilities related to their specific domain. For instance, Poseidon has control over water, and Apollo having control over the sun.

Abilities[edit | edit source]

All Olympians possess specific skills associated with their area of expertise. For example, as the Olympian God of War, Ares is a formidable combatant with extensive knowledge of both armed and unarmed combat where as Aphrodite, Olympian Goddess of Love, is highly skilled in all forms of physical and sexual pleasure. Most Olympians have had some degree of armed and unarmed combat training.

Weaknesses[edit | edit source]

  • However, gods are not all-powerful. They can tire or be overpowered by immortals and even powerful demigods. If they choose to engage in a physical battle they can be injured through the proper weaponry. However, because gods can exist in many places at once, only a fraction of their power is used in combat against demigods.
  • Though they are mighty, the gods do have weaknesses. They can be injured by supernatural weapons (whether it's made from Celestial Bronze, Imperial Gold, Stygian Iron [only in Hades, the Greek Underworld], Divine Silver or Adamantine), but are invulnerable to conventional physical attacks. Magic can harm them too; also, they can't break through magic chains (whether it's made from Celestial Bronze, Imperial Gold, Stygian Iron [only in Hades, the Greek Underworld], Divine Silver or Adamantine) that wrapped them unless broken by another god/goddess.
  • Divine Laws: Despite their immense power, gods are bound by laws and oaths sworn upon the River Styx. However, due to their immortal nature, breaking such oaths doesn't have severe consequences to them most of the time, although it may have consequences on people they care or cared about.
    • No god can enter the domain of another unless invited by the lord/lady of said domain or unless their domain overlaps. The only known gods to freely travel the worlds are Hermes and Iris, both of which are the messenger deities.
    • No god can directly steal the symbol of power of another. This applies to both the Titans and Olympians. As mortals and demigods are free from this rule, this is the reason why Zeus knew a hero or mortal had stolen his Master Bolt.
    • Gods are limited to how much they can interfere in mortal affairs. This rule is a decree of Zeus, so it depends on how much he enforces it or knows about it. Some gods have violated this rule without incurring any punishment, such as Apollo or Hera.
    • Immortals can only fight demigods after being challenged or attacked first. However, Titans have been shown to ignore this rule. It is likely, though, that this rule isn't compulsory.
  • Lust: Gods are, in general, lustful — with the exceptions of the maiden goddesses and deities of marriage — and often have many illegitimate children, both immortal and demigod.
  • Immaturity & Arrogance: Most gods also tend to be petty or immature and a lot of them are arrogant and underestimate their opponents. Because the gods are immortal, they feel little reason to change or adapt (except to adapt to their current home) as a result they often lack maturity or sense of personal growth, often resulting in many broken promises.
  • If a god or goddess is magically bounded or trapped in a magical prison of some kind, his or her power is useless, as the magical bindings act as an anchor keeping them in place, akin to a bear caught in a trap. Some examples of this are the situations of Hera and Artemis respectively as well as Hephaestus trapping Aphrodite and Ares together in a magic net in older myths.
  • Pride, Arrogance/Narcissism & Egotism: In addition, like homo sapiens (on the Left & the political/bureaucratic/global elites [especially in power & in the media, etc.]), the gods (excluding the Good Gods) can be very prideful of the things they do or the choices they make. They are often too proud to admit when they need help or when they have committed mistakes, instead believing themselves to be beyond help from regular mortals and demigods. Gods generally believe that they should be feared and respected. Due to their pride & selfishness, they see admitting they need help as a sign of weakness. Furthermore, the gods will show signs of contempt towards the children of their enemies, sometimes even if those children are the offspring of other gods, most likely since Divine Laws prevent gods from attacking each other directly and thus do fight through their demigod offspring. It is these traits that often cause many beings, both mortal and immortal alike, to hate the gods and the reason why the gods are occasionally viewed as being no better than the Titans.
  • Other Gods: Despite there immortality, Olympian Gods are not (truly) un-killable; as the only thing that can kill the old gods are other gods; such as Demigods and the New Gods of New Genesis and Apokolips respectively.
    • Another known way to permanently defeat a god is to scatter their essence. This happened to Ouranos, Cronus and Gaia. If they are defeated in a way that scatters their essence enough, they will be unable to reform and create a consciousness or a body ever again.
  • Power Loss: Olympian powers are dependent on the faith of their followers. A god can survive a lack of worship or loss of their domain so long as their will to live is strong enough. Otherwise, they will fade. However, even if their will is strong enough they won't be powerful enough to maintain a physical form, as Kronos was able to survive, due to sheer willpower, yet remain powerless in Tartarus. If their thrones (or other sources of power) are destroyed, they will also fade along with it or become so weakened that they can no longer take a physical form.

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